Paradigm for Parity® Coalition Companies Are Prioritizing Hiring and Promoting Diverse Candidates

Women and men enter the workforce at the same rate, but as women climb the corporate ladder the percent of women in leadership positions drops significantly, according to the 2018 Women in the Workplace report. Paradigm for Parity® coalition companies are working to prioritize diversity as they hire and promote employees. Executives from Bloomberg LP, Ingersoll Rand and Willis Towers Watson share the steps they are taking to get more women into leadership positions.

Paradigm for Parity® Coalition Companies Are Putting the 5-Point Action Plan into Practice

The Paradigm for Parity® 5-Point Action Plan is comprised of actionable steps that companies can take to achieve gender parity in corporate leadership by 2030. Our 92 committed companies are using the action plan to design programs and practices within their own companies to close the gender gap. Edison International, Heidrick & Struggles and VF Corporation are making meaningful changes within their companies to increase the number of women in leadership positions.

Paradigm for Parity® Coalition Companies are Setting Gender Parity Goals and Making Progress

A critical step to closing the gender gap in corporate leadership is setting measurable goals and communicating about progress. Since the Paradigm for Parity® coalition launched two years ago, our 92 companies are putting our 5-Point Action Plan into practice and they are seeing the results. Leaders from three coalition companies — Accenture, Sodexo and UTC — are sharing the goals that they’ve set and how they are working to achieve them.

Women’s Equality Day Reminds us of How Much More There Is to Do

By Sandra Beach Lin, Jewelle Bickford and Ellen Kullman, Paradigm for Parity ® Co-chairs

On August 26th we celebrate the 98th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right to vote!  We remember the women who would not be denied. Because of their persistence, generations of women were given the opportunity to participate in our democracy. But as history has shown, despite having made great strides, women have a long way to go to achieve true equality. 

To Eliminate Pay Inequity, We Must Change Corporate Culture

by Jewelle Bickford, Paradigm for Parity Co-chair

As we observe this year’s Pay Equity Day, we are faced with the stark and sobering reality that many women had to work approximately four months into 2018 to make the same amount as men earned in 2017. 

In Our Sisters' Shoes: What We Should All Learn from Black Women

by Stacey Tisdale, a member of Paradigm for Parity

The global conversation about women’s equality, however, must move from focusing on problems to highlighting solutions that acknowledge that different women have different experiences if we are to ever find the unity within our diversity.

Women in Business Advise on How to Succeed in Corporations

This month the Paradigm for Parity® coalition has celebrated the many contributions of women in business. And while there have been so many amazing women leading the way, it is important to address the next generation of women trying to reach their full potential and become leaders

Men Advise Men on How to Create Gender Parity

The companies that have joined the Paradigm for Parity® coalition understand that men play an important role in getting more women in leadership positions. During Women’s History Month, several male leaders from Paradigm for Parity® coalition member companies offer some advice on how men can empower women with opportunities to advance that will help pave the way for parity in the workforce.

Men Should Sponsor Women in the Workplace, Not Back Away

The findings released today by LeanIn and SurveyMonkey are deeply concerning: in the wake of the sexual harassment scandals, men are uncomfortable participating in common work activities with women, including mentorship. If women are ever going to have access to the same career and growth opportunities as men, they need the help of sponsors and mentors. Because the reality is, male managers are often steadfast allies to Jack, but not Jill.